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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Oct 10, 2009 9:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3 for 10-10

What, no mention of the extraordinary set from the Matrix in 1968?

Jam , It's A Sin, Next Time You See Me Jam, The Rub Jam, Look On Yonder Wall, Jam > Turn On Your Lovelight Jam > Drums > Jam > The Other One Jam > Jam > Death Don't Have No Mercy, Dark Star Jam > The Eleven Jam > The Seven

http://www.archive.org/details/gd68-10-10.sbd.miller-ladner.4513.sbeok.shnf

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Oct 10, 2009 3:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3 for 10-10

I'm with Cliff on this one, and I suppose PM William

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 11, 2009 3:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3 for 10-10

I will have to revisit these...I have not in some time, and was in part not happy with the sound quality of portions of the ones I came on early in collecting days...have actually used them to support the "Bob is important thesis" if you can believe it.

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Oct 10, 2009 4:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3 for 10-10

Perhaps a minor point but I agree w/Strat on the TENNESSEE JED of 10-10-82...absolutely my favorite all-time version...note-perfect Jerry solo leading into the final chorus...if you're a JED fan you need to check it out.

Show also contains one of the band's better encores: Satisfaction>Baby Blue. All around great '82 show, possibly the best of that year.

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Oct 10, 2009 12:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3 for 10-10

Yeah, I'm with you, Cliff. If there are musical equivalents of those stone tablets that us old farts have been teased about recently, then this is one of them. Rhythmic seeds you can hear in the jams played on this night sprout for the next decade (as you pointed out in a review). Here's a little background for folks who don't have the books handy.


From THE DEADHEAD’S TAPING COMPENDIUM, vol 1:

Peter Abram owned the Matrix Coffeehouse in San Francisco when Jerry Garcia, Phil Lesh, Mickey Hart, and friends played several well-known gigs in late 1968 under the name Mickey Hart and the Hartbeats. The tapes of these shows, which enjoy wide circulation, display some of the most free-form jamming of these musicians’ entire careers. The club held only 105 people. According to Abram, only around eighty people were there for those shows, which were pulled together on very short notice.

Peter Abram: It would have been called Grateful Dead Jam or something like that, but Chet Helms got freaked out because he was having them at the Family Dog event the following weekend and he insisted that they not play.

A compromise was made, Abram remembers. The gig would go on, as long as the name Grateful Dead was omitted from promotions, and so Mickey Hart and the Hartbeats was born [posters billed 10-10-68 as "Jerry Garrceeah and His Friends"]. The experience of these shows, the loose, hangout feeling of a tiny coffeehouse venue, was reflected in the sound. Several guests sat in, including Elvin Bishop and Jack Casady. The result was a continuous stream of jams.

Peter Abram: Toward the end of the night things usually loosened up and if guys like Jack Casady were around, they’d hop on stage and join the band. They came back with Jerry Garcia and Friends a few years later, when he was putting together the Jerry Garcia Band. And he played there every Monday and Tuesday night for two years. I recorded all that stuff on half-inch four-track tape. But when the club closed I just left them there. It was too much bulk and I didn’t have a way to play them back anyway.

To record the Hartbeats’ shows, Abram used a Sony 777. Though these tapes are noticeably hissy, the jamming on them is immense.

Peter Abram: The heads were worn out on my machine. The tapes sounded great over the headphones, but when I played them back between sets I knew something was wrong. Owsley lent me his mikes, which helped some. At the time I was using two thirteen-dollar Calrad microphones, so whatever he had was an improvement. But since that wasn’t the key problem, it didn’t help. I’m not sure about the mixer; it could possibly have been a Sony of some sort. The mikes were probably Shore 57s, Electrovoice 676s.